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April 29, 1981

The Concilio is Founded

Originally named Dallas Concilio of Hispanic Service Organizations

In 1981 Nellie Tafalla, Adolph Canales and Alex Bickley, created the Dallas Concilio to provide a medium through which community members, service organizations and corporations could work together to effectively meet the needs of the growing Latino population in Dallas.

The Concilio is Founded

Originally named Dallas Concilio of Hispanic Services Organization

In 1981 Nellie Tafalla, Adolph Canales and Alex Bickley, created the Dallas Concilio to provide a medium through which community members, service organizations and corporations could work together to effectively meet the needs of the growing Latino population in Dallas.

April 30, 1982

First annual
Mary Lee Castro Awards Banquet

With David Moreno Sanchez as the first Executive Director, The Concilio created the first annual Mary Lee Castro Awards Banquet to honor individuals and organizations that made significant contributions to the Latino community. Recipients include: Sister Viola Brown of Marillac Social Center, Josephine Torres, Liz-Flores Velásquez, Adelfa Callejo, Ruben Esquivel and Joe Landin.

1992

The Concilio joins the
"Hispanic Health Link"

In 1992, The Concilio joined the “Hispanic Health Link” and became a regional representative of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations. This partnership ushered in a new era for The Concilio and one of its prominent programs was born, the “Proyecto Informar,” a cultural competency program designed to train human service providers.

1993

The Concilio launches its youth program
“Psyched About Science and Math”

The “Psyched About Science and Math” (PASM) program began as a way to encourage Hispanic children to pursue education in science and math related fields. In its first year alone, PASM brought 200 attendees to the event.

1994

LIDER Diabetes Project funded

The LIDER Diabetes Program, a program designed to raise awareness of diabetes and help in prevention education, was funded with a one-year grant from the Office of Minority Health.

1995-2001

During the mid to late 1990's, The Concilio continued to address the various needs of the Hispanic community.

  • National Council of La Raza (NCLR) Affiliation, 1995
  • HIV/SIDA Coalition holds first meeting, 1996
  • Immigration and Welfare Reform Conference, 1996
  • Managed Care Promotora Program funded by the Office of Minority Health, 1997
  • Texas Department of Health awards a grant for the Diabetes Awareness & Education in the Community (DAEC), 1998
  • COSSMHO awards the Concilio a grant for the Children’s Insurance Program (CHIP) effort, 1999
  • NCLR awards a grant for the Tejano Diabetes Project, 1999
  • REACH 2010 project is funded by NCLR to design a replicable program to address the health care disparities among minorities as it relates to diabetes, 2000

2001

Johnson & Johnson selects the Dallas Concilio for its Community Health Crystal Award

The Concilio is one of eight organizations in the country, and the only one in Texas, to receive a two-year grant totaling $100,000 to fund the Promotora program.

December 2002

The PIQE (Parent Institute for Quality Education) program was introduced

The PIQE (Parent Institute for Quality Education) program was introduced at James Bowie Elementary. The curriculum was a model of an existing program that originated in San Diego, California that sought to reduce the drop out rate of Hispanic children. At that time, the Texas drop out rate for hispanic children was 64%. Out of 100 children entering kindergarden, approximately 10 would graduate from high school and only 2 would earn a bachelor’s degree or higher.

The program was designed to educate Hispanic parents about the importance of their children’s education and show them how to encourage their children to pursue higher education. The inaugural class in 2002 graduated 124 parents, and since then, this successful program has graduated over 700 non-duplicate participants in the pursuit of decreasing the drop out rate among Hispanic children.

2005

executive-director

New Executive Director

Florencia Velasco Fortner is hired as the new
Executive Director.